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Stefan Sagmeister: You are not a storyteller. 

Industrial design is a curious profession. Its practitioners are not quite artists, though they are artistic; they are not inventors, though they are inventive; and they are not engineers, though the best of them bring a deep technical understanding to their work.

The Verge profiles Yves Behar here.

Perhaps, it is this in-between state of Industrial designers that impels them to push the envelope in design and innovation.

For centuries, the myth of the lone genius has towered over us, its shadow obscuring the way creative work really gets done. The attempts to pick apart the Lennon-McCartney partnership reveal just how misleading that myth can be, because John and Paul were so obviously more creative as a pair than as individuals, even if at times they appeared to work in opposition to each other. The lone-genius myth prevents us from grappling with a series of paradoxes about creative pairs: that distance doesn’t impede intimacy, and is often a crucial ingredient of it; that competition and collaboration are often entwined. Only when we explore this terrain can we grasp how such pairs as Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, and Martin Luther King Jr. and Ralph Abernathy all managed to do such creative work. The essence of their achievements, it turns out, was relational. If that seems far-fetched, it’s because our cultural obsession with the individual has obscured the power of the creative pair.

— The power of two, The Atlantic

Technology leadership is not defined by patents, which history has repeatedly shown to be small protection indeed against a determined competitor, but rather by the ability of a company to attract and motivate the world’s most talented engineers,” he says. “We believe that applying the Open Source philosophy to our patents will strengthen rather than diminish Tesla’s position in this regard.

theeconomist:

In April 2012 we produced a cover on 3D printing entitled “The third industrial revolution” it inspired Kae Woei Lim, a designer at XYZ Workshop, to actually recreate it in three dimensions. The results are superb. 

(via notational)

In other words, to produce work and build an audience in the digital context is a dynamic choreography, and to succeed depends on the degree to which your mindset is emergent: Adaptable, responsive, and always in the process of becoming something new.

The emergent mindset, on Medium

Seven digital deadly sins →

It has been 25 years since the invention of the world wide web and more than 2 billion people are now connected. How does this information revolution affect us personally, socially and morally? In this interactive feature, a collaboration between The Guardian and The National Film Board of Canada, we find out what pride, lust, greed, gluttony, envy, wrath and sloth mean in the digital world. 

To put our faith in tangible goals would seem to be, at best, unwise. So we do not strive to be firemen, we do not strive to be bankers, nor policemen, nor doctors. WE STRIVE TO BE OURSELVES.

But don’t misunderstand me. I don’t mean that we can’t BE firemen, bankers, or doctors—but that we must make the goal conform to the individual, rather than make the individual conform to the goal. In every man, heredity and environment have combined to produce a creature of certain abilities and desires—including a deeply ingrained need to function in such a way that his life will be MEANINGFUL. A man has to BE something; he has to matter.

— Hunter S.Thompson

Every man is the sum total of his reactions to experience. As your experiences differ and multiply, you become a different man, and hence your perspective changes. This goes on and on. Every reaction is a learning process; every significant experience alters your perspective.

— Hunter S. Thompson

Typo as a tribute to invention.
Ingeniously done this :)
Before there was a phonograph, there was a diagram of it. This is the case with many of the inventions we know today. Scientists and inventors have always used diagrams to simplify complex ideas— these drawings are often the first step in turning nebulous thoughts into a tangible thing or theory.
Khyati Trehan, a design student in New Delhi, pays homage to the beauty of the scientific diagram with a series of lettering illustrations that depict some of the most important scientific and technological advancements of our time. There’s an invention for almost every letter of the alphabet, each corresponding to the person who was credited for making the discovery.
Read more here. 

Typo as a tribute to invention.

Ingeniously done this :)

Before there was a phonograph, there was a diagram of it. This is the case with many of the inventions we know today. Scientists and inventors have always used diagrams to simplify complex ideas— these drawings are often the first step in turning nebulous thoughts into a tangible thing or theory.

Khyati Trehan, a design student in New Delhi, pays homage to the beauty of the scientific diagram with a series of lettering illustrations that depict some of the most important scientific and technological advancements of our time. There’s an invention for almost every letter of the alphabet, each corresponding to the person who was credited for making the discovery.

Read more here